Lumbar Spine & Disc Forces during Exercise: Rian Kenny

Lumbar Spine & Disc Forces during Exercise

When we hear about ‘Disc Herniation’ we usually associate such a thing with the lower back or lumbar spine, a common mechanism has been shown in clinical studies to be flexion of the lumbar spine (repeated or prolonged) and also some degree of twisting although this alone is not thought to be as damaging as flexion. Stuart McGill, Ph.D., author of the book “Low Back Disorders,” concluded that repeated or prolonged spine flexion is the primary mechanism leading to lumbar disc herniation.

The disc on the left is healthy with no damage to the outer fibres allowing the centre (nucleus pulposis) to stay central and provide good support to the vertebra above and below the joint. The centre disc is showing early signs of outer fibre damage and as we can see this allows the nucleus to ‘bulge’ outward toward the spinal cord and nerve roots. The disc on the right is showing a complete herniation or prolapse of the nucleus through the annulus fibres which have been catastrophically damaged, this results in spinal nerve root and central cord stenosis which can present with extreme pain locally and radiation or referral, most commonly down the legs.

The Discs themselves act as ‘shock absorbers’ between the vertebrae and are made up of outer fibres (annulus fibrosis) which is dense tough connective tissue almost ligament like in its make up and a jelly like centre which provides some spring (nucleus pulposis) which is well hydrated and allows shock absorption throughout the spine. A herniation of the discs usually results from damage to the outer fibres of the disc and subsequent ‘bulging’ of the nucleus pulposis, which is referred to by many names; slipped disc, bulging disc, herniation, prolapse all depending on the degree of damage (As seen Above)

Now that we have an understanding of the disc and what it does we can look at how the damage seen above can and usually does occur. Physics determines that when we move our spine the disc (due to its spongy make up) moves in between the vertebra and for the sake of this article we are going to have a look at the effect flexion of the spine has upon the disc.

We can see that when the spine is placed into flexion the nucleus of the disc if forced backward, toward the spinal cord, if we look back it was concluded that repeated or prolonged spine flexion is the primary mechanism leading to lumbar disc herniation. So if we apply this to exercises such as the squat and the deadlift we are placing an even greater load upon the spine and the discs with the added resistance, which results in a greater force upon the nucleus and a more detrimental effect on the outer fibres of the disc, which can result in a failure of these structures leading to possible herniation or protrusion of the disc.

It is fairly common to see people perform a squat (at the base of the squat) or deadlift (during the initial phase of the lift) with some degree of lumbar flexion or reverse of the normal courve, if this is occurring every time the exercise is performed we are exposing our lumbar spine and discs to an extremely forceful and repetitive damaging stimulus, which can and most likely will result in either the centre disc as seen above or even worse the disc on the right.

It is extremely important to note that when we are squatting or deadlifting that to reduce injuries, proper form should be stressed before increasing weight loads!! Physical restrictions whether it be joint restriction, muscular restriction or a biomechanical issue may affect the way in which you can perform a squat/deadlift or any other exercise for that matter, need to be addressed before you can squat as deep as you want to or perform a perfect deadlift.

If you find that you flex your lower back when you squat or deadlift firstly; lower the weight and see if there is any improvement and secondly; get assessed by your chiro or physio to check for any physical limitations your body may need addressed before you are able to progress with the exercise!

Take Home Tips:

  • When performing any exercise aim to maintain the normal curve in your spine
  • Stress proper form over increase in weight to reduce risk of injury
  • Get checked out to make sure you aren’t putting yourself at risk of injury and possibly address some of the reasons why your are flexing the lower back (of which there are many!!)
  • Following these tips you will probably find your lower back isn’t aching after a workout and in the long run you wont run into any more serious injuries!

 

Rian Kenny20160127_123651

Principal Chiropractor (Tuesday & Thursday )

Natural Health Practice

What to Eat during Seasons According To Traditional Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese Medicine

is a system which came into existence thousands of years ago, and is still used throughout the world. Chinese medicine is more comprehensive than a simple list of medicines and their recipes use herbs and naturally found elements. Traditional Chinese Medicine focuses on prevention more than cure. This is why tips for food intake are a prominent part of the system.

Which seasons does Traditional Chinese Medicine have?

Like contemporary times, the primary focus of Traditional Chinese Medicine is on the four common seasons namely summer, autumn, winter and fall. Different elements are associated with each of the seasons in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Additionally, tips for reaping the most benefits of each season can also be derived from Traditional Chinese Medicine.

 

The ancient system of medicine proposed by the Chinese is constantly changing to better suit the modern times. For this reason, it is seen that food from endangered species is often substituted with other naturally found substances which can provide the same results. Traditional Chinese Medicine even describes which emotions are associated with every season and which foods should be eaten in each season.

Summer

Plants are a major part of the proposed summer season diet according to Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is believed that excessive sweating can decrease heart-qi, which results in irritability and even insomnia. This is why naturally sour and salty flavours are suggested in the summer. Foods to keep the body cool and balanced are recommended including tomatoes, water melons, wax gourd, lotus roots and even strawberries.

Spring

Spring is the season of rejuvenation in Traditional Chinese Medicine. Health problems, however, are a valid concern in spring. Traditional Chinese Medicine, there, recommends the intake of foods which can replenish qi including wheat, dates, spinach, bamboo shoots and Chinese yam.

Winter

Since winter is associated with energy conservation and hibernation, Traditional Chinese Medicine recommends the intake of foods which are high in fat and protein in the winter season. This includes meats like mutton, beef and duck meat. Mushrooms, leeks, yams and dates are also recommended because these are all foods rich in energy.

Autumn

Traditional Chinese Medicine recognises that the body needs to prepare to adjust to the changing season. Since autumn is generally associated with dry weather, Traditional Chinese Medicine recommends the intake of foods which can help produce lubricating effects. These include pears, lily bulbs, pineapples and lemon.

It is also suggested that the intake of pungent flavours like ginger and onion is minimised as they can have adverse effects in autumn.

To learn more about Traditional Chinese Medicine in Sydney, contact Rodd Sanchez Acupuncture Sydney

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine 

 

Bioptron Facial Gua Sha Technique

Bioptron Facial Gua Sha Technique

ACCELERATE HEALING & INFLAMMATION WITH BIOPTRON

BIOPTRON Light Therapy is a medical light therapy device which can be used with adults and children as a complementary therapy to reduce pain and promote healing in various types of conditions, such as: Skin disorders, anti-aging as well as pre-and post-therapy to promote wound healing.

The bioptron light therapy used at Sydney acupuncture clinic is used as a standalone device as well as complementary therapy. It is fabulous for recovery after various dermatological and aesthetical treatments because BIOPTRON is proven to:

 

  • Improve microcirculation;
  • Harmonize metabolic processes;
  • Reinforce the human defence system;
  • Stimulate regenerative and reparative processes of the entire organism;
  • Promote wound healing;
  • Relieve pain or decrease its intensity;
  • Reduce inflammation.

 

The use light therapy in all our clinic is for inflammation and anti-aging therapies. We a specialised custom bioptron facial gua sha technique (BFGST). The polarized light is also used in hair treatments for alopecia. The light therapy assist on the cellular level, by reducing inflammation and increasing local blood flow and release of inflammatory factors that promote follicular vascularization.

Sydney Bioptron therapy at Natural Health practice is a safe and effective medical treatment with a wide range of applications for health, beauty and well-being, well known for

 

  • Natural healing therapy and pain relief
  • Rehabilitation
  • Prevention
  • No known side-effects
  • For home and professional use

 

LINEAR POLARIZED LIGHT

BIOPTRON Sydney uses light waves move on parallel planes. BIOPTRON Light ensures optimal penetration of tissues to stimulate the immune system for faster and more effective healing.

INCOHERENT LIGHT

BIOPTRON Sydney incoherent light contributes to faster, safe, painless and effective healing. The light is Soft, low intensively light, dynamic penetration, no risk of damaging tissues and no known side effects.

POLYCHROMATIC LIGHT

The Bioptron uses a broad range of wavelengths from 480 to 3400 nm, containing the colour range of visible light wavelengths plus a part of the infrared spectrum. Different light wavelengths penetrate the skin at different depths, activating cells, accelerating local blood circulation and stimulating the whole body’s regenerative processes. UV – free. No risk of adverse effects.

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine 

Suan Mei Tang : Sour Drink : Sydney Chinese Herbal

Suan Mei Tang 酸梅汤 – Sour plum drink

If you have been in the clinic in the past month or so, you may have tried the sour drink, which we have been cooking recently. Not only is it tasty but it is fabulous to stimulate your digestive juices. This sour plum drink (Suan Mei Tang)  is great for breaking down fats, lowering cholesterol and enjoying with any meal .

 

Below is the simple ingredients and process to make your own at home. The herbs can be purchased from the Sydney Acupuncture clinic

Ingredients for Suan Mei Tang 

3 or 4 sour dried black plums (wumei)

Small handful sliced dried hawthorn fruits (shanzha)

Small handful sliced dried licorice root (gancao)

4 cups filtered water

2 hunks of rock sugar (the size of walnuts)

2 tablespoons dried osmanthus blossoms (guihua)

 

  1. Place the plums, hawthorn fruits, licorice root, in a sieve and rinse them well under running water. Shake them dry and place them in a clay pot. Pour 4 cups filtered water over the dry ingredients and let them soak for at least an hour to plump them up.

 

  1. Bring the pot to a full boil, and then lower the heat to a gentle simmer for about 1 hour. Add the rock sugar and optional salt, and simmer the infusion until the sugar melts; taste and add more if you want. Add either the osmanthus blossoms then let the infusion come to room temperature.

 

  1. Chill it overnight to allow the flavours to develop. Strain and add enough ice water to make 4 cups, or to taste. Serve icy cold without any ice.

 

Individual Herb Property and Action

Wu Mei : Property> Sour, astringent, neutral; liver, spleen, lung, and large intestine meridians entered.  

Actions> Astringe intestines to check diarrhea, astringe lung to check cough, promote the generation of fluid.

Shan Zha : Property> Sour, sweet, slightly warm; spleen, stomach and liver meridian entered.

Actions>Promote digestion and dissipate food stagnation, activate blood and resolve stasis.

Gan Cao: Property> Sweet, slightly cold; heart, lung and spleen meridians entered.

Actions> Tonify qi of heart and spleen, dispel phlegm, relieve cough and dyspnoea, relieve spasm and pain, clear heat and relieve toxicity, and harmonize property of medicine.

 

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine 

How does Gua sha therapy work?

Gua sha therapy

Gua sha therapy as practiced in by the practiionwrs at Sydney Acupuncture clinic is a technique from traditional Chinese medicine which is believed to aid healing and stimulate blood flow. According to practitioners, Gua sha can be used to remove unhealthy elements from the body, especially targeting injured areas.

Gua sha therapy has been indicated and promoted for any condition which presented with blood stasis internal or external resulting in pain. Whilst investiaging the Chinese medical litriture an array of conditions can respond  to gua sha therpy which include  headaches, igraine, neck, shoulder, back, and knee pain, as well as acute diseases such as fever, flu, asthma and bronchitis in children and adults. Gua sha is also effective in chronic disease including hepatitis.

How old is Gua sha?

The earliest reported use of Gua sha as a medical treatment in China dates back around 2,000 years. The literal meaning of Gua sha therapy  is “scrape rash”. The term appears to originate from an ancient text of Chinese medicine, Shang Han Lun, which is believed to be as old as 220 CE.

The Gua sha technique was soon transferred to south eastern countries like Vietnam where it became popular almost instantly. Multiple variations of Gua sha exist in Asia . Some variants of this ancient Chinese medical technique use different tools from a coin through to spoons, cow horns. Using oil or balm as lubrication, pressure is applied to the affected area using a implement.

Technique

 

As the translation suggests, Gua sha involves scraping the body. Commonly, a lubricant is applied to the area which is to be treated using Gua sha therapy , after which, pressure is applied in strokes using an edged instrument. Even though the most common scraping instruments are metal caps, the instrument can be anything from a ceramic Chinese soup spoon to coins- and even animal bones!

The instrument is pressed down firmly on skin and then moved/ stroked down along muscles or along acupuncture meridians. The strokes for Gua sha are typically four to six inches long. These strokes, however, may result in small capillary rupture, these are not causing internal bleeding or bruising as opposed to what people believe. Since the strokes do not because what can qualify as bruises, the marks also disappear in a considerably short amount of time.

 

Other names for Gua Sha therapy 

Graston Technique (GT) is a “trademarked” therapeutic manual method for diagnosing and treating disorders of the muscles, skeletal and related con

gau Sha , GUASHA

Gua Sha therapy by Rodd Sanchez

nective tissue condition s. The Graston Technique was initialised by David Graston which uses a collection of stainless steel instruments of particular shape which practitioners to rub / scape over muscles in order to sense and resolve adhesions in tendons and muscles.  Practitioners must be licensed in order to use the Graston Technique name, but results are very similar to tradition GuA Sha

 

Instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) is a popular treatment for myofascial restriction. IASTM uses specially designed instruments to provide a mobilizing effect to scar tissue and myofascial adhesions.

 

 

How is cupping different from Gua sha?

Even though both techniques are essentially used to remove toxins from the body and stimulate blood flow, there are a few differences in the way in which these techniques are performed. Cupping makes use of heat or suction to create a vacuum within a cup which is placed on lubricated skin. The purpose of this suction or heat is to open any blocked passages of nutrients within the body.

Contgade gua sha rary to what most people believe, both cupping and Gua sha are completely painless as long as the technique is performed by a skilled professional. If you live in Sydney or Sylvania and would like to be treated using Gua sha or cupping, contact Rodd Sanchez.

Sydney Gua Sha Therapy & Sylvania Gua Sha  Therapy

 

 

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine 

Gan Mai Da Zao Tang

GAN MAI DA ZAO TANGgan mai da zao tang

English name for this formula : Licorice, Wheat, and Jujube Decoction; Glycyrrhiza-Triticum-Ziziphus Decoction.

Gan Mai Da Zao Tang formulation comes from Jin Gui Yao Lue (Essential Prescriptions of the Golden Coffer) text. written by Zhang Zhongjing (150-219) at the end of the Eastern Han dynasty and was first published in the Northern Song dynasty.

This formulation is now available in clinic in both cooked fresh daily or in dry form so you can make your own at home

PATTERN

Malnourishment of the heart spirit (due to an underlying liver-spleen disharmony)

Actions:

The functions of this Chinese medicine formula are to nourish the heart and calm the spirit while harmonizing the middle jiao. This Traditional Chinese Medicine  Herbal formula is best suited for conditions of excessive worry, anxiety or pensiveness injuring heart yin and disturbing normal liver Qi flow. Due to the liver Qi being affected there is commonly spleen disorders present in this pattern of disease.

 

 

INDICATIONS

1) neurological and psychiatric disorders, such as general anxiety disorder, hysteria, epilepsy, paediatric night terrors, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, sleep-walking, and migraine headaches;

2) spasmodic disorders, such as spasmodic cough, Parkinson’s disease, gastric spasms, and spasms of the extremities

3) disorders of the electrical system of the heart, including sinus tachycardia and ectopic heartbeats

 

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS OF MALNOURISHMENT OF THE HEART INCLUDE

 

* Insomnia

* Possible night sweats

* Anxiety

* Restlessness

* Heart palpitations

* Sighing

* Depression and melancholy

 

fu xiao mai

FORMULA EXPLANATION

Gan Cao (Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis, Licorice Root) -nourish heart, harmonize middle jiao

Fu Xiao Mai (Semen Tritici Aestivi Levis, Light Wheat Grain (unripe Wheat)) -tonify Qi, nourish yin, regulates heart

Da Zao (Fructus Ziziphi Jujubae, Chinese Date, Jujube) -tonify Qi, nourish fluids

Other modifications

We can also add YU JIN – Radix Curcumae, YUAN ZHI – Radix Polygalae Tenuifoliae, SHI CHANG PU – Rhizoma Acori

Calm & Ease Decoction / Gan Mai Da Zao Wan(Tang)Gan Mai Da Zao Tang ( Calm & Ease Decoction ) is a classical formula…

Posted by Sydney Acupuncturist Rodd Sanchez on Monday, 10 April 2017

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine