Glutamine, What we should know

Glutamine, What we should know

Glutamine Amino acids

Glutamine

L-glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the body that accounts for over 60% of free amino acids with in the blood system, internal organs, skeletal muscle, tissue and brain. This critical amino acid is essential for a vast number of different functions within the body which can improve the overall health conditions. Glutamine plays an important role in cardiovascular function by providing a key energy source for endothelial cells that line blood vessels. It regulates nitric oxide synthesis by these endothelial cells, and maintains blood vessel tone and prevents inflammation in the walls of blood vessel. Glutamine enhances healthy neurological function and has strong potentials of improving mood, memory and concentration. When Glutamine crosses the blood-brain barrier, it is converted into L-glutamic acid, which aids in cerebral function.  Glutamic acid has unique characteristics of converting into energy source for neuronal cells when blood sugar is low. This characteristic is said to be the reason for glutamine’s ability to damper alcohol cravings and sugar. Glutamine is also an essential part of our digestive system, hence its regulation of cellular reproduction.
Glutamine equally aids the regulation of cells as they absorb water across the junction between blood stream and the small intestine, which protects the body from losing fluid and experiencing dehydration. When the body does not absorb water, it leads to diarrhea, which can result to loss of vital nutrients.
It plays a vital role in both cellular and systematic processes of detoxification; it acts as a major energy source for lymphatic cells helping in the removal of toxic debris.  Glutamine acts as a transport agent in the removal of ammonia out of major tissues, such as the brain, from where it is transported to the liver for its conversion into urea. Increased Infections

amino acid glutamine

Glutamine chart

Deficiency can lead to increased risk of infection.  Low levels of glutamine can lead to increased susceptibility to infection, because during times illness or excessive exercise, the body gives out cortisol, which ultimately reduces glutamine levels. Glutamine deficiency can equally lead to weight loss for people that suffer from chronic gastrointestinal distress such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Low levels of glutamine can lead to bowel changes by influencing the gastrointestinal system in the body. The body digests food and converts part of it to glucose to be utilized by the cells for energy; glutamine steps in to supply energy to the cells. Low glutamine levels result to reduction to the activities of the cell in this part of the body. In many situations, glutamine has been used as a supplement for those with chronic disorders that cause excess diarrhea.

L-glutamine can be found in animal proteins such as dairy and meat, in combination with plant based protein sources such as raw spinach, beans, parsley and red cabbage. In most cases, the plant proteins are not as easily digestible when compared with the animal proteins. Rich food sources of L-glutamine include grass-fed beef, bone broth, Chinese cabbage, cottage cheese, spirulina, asparagus, turkey, wild caught fish (salmon, cod and tuna), broccoli raab, beans, and meat. It is recommended that each day; you take in three or more L-glutamine foods.

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care

 

 

 

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine 

Folate, All You Need to Know

Folate , All You Need to Know

foods rich in folate

folate

Folate (folic acid) is a type of vitamin B that aids in the development and repairing of DNA. It equally helps in the production of red blood cells (RBCs) in the body. Folic acid is not stored in our fat cells unlike vitamin B12, because of its solubility in water. In essence, the body needs folic acid always since no reserve of it stored. During urinary excretion, water-soluble vitamins are released, making it an impossible mission for vitamins like folic acid to remain in the body for long.

Folic acid deficiency or insufficiency can lead to anaemia ( i.e megaloblatic anaemia),  showing symptoms like; pale skin, diarrhea, breathlessness, tiredness, emotional changes and heart palpitations. Folate deficiency can equally result to child defect during pregnancy. Subtle symptoms of folate insufficiency include; growth problems, grey hair, mouth sores, fatigue and tongue swelling.

Folate deficiency is caused by poor intake or malabsorption of folate in the body. Folic acid insufficiency can occur for a number of reasons, including:

folate calcium omega

folate

  1. Excessive intake of alcohol, which reduces the ability of the body to make use of folate.
  2. Blood conditions leading to the damage of red blood cells in the body.
  3. Digestive disorders resulting to inflammatory diseases, hence reducing the ability of the body to absorb folate.
  4. The use of certain medicines that can interfere with the level of folate in the body.
  5. Extra amounts of folate are normally needed during pregnancy.

 

Treatment involves increasing the intake of folate in our diets. To avoid folic acid deficiency, nutritious diets should be eaten, and such foods include; brussel sprouts, peas, spinach, broccoli, shellfish, poultry, fortified cereals, eggs, tomato juice, mushrooms, beans and legumes, citrus, fruits, kidney and liver meat, asparagus and wheat bran.

It is recommended that women who may become pregnant should take folate supplement, because of its importance for fetal growth. People who take drugs that cause folate deficiency, should equally take folate supplements. Seeing  your doctor before any action is usually the best!

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Everything about Vitamin E

Vitamin E (deficiency symptoms and food sources)Notepad with vitamin e and pills on the table.

Vitamin E acts as an antioxidant that aids to protect the cells in the body from damages. It is fat-soluble in nature and found in many of our foods. As an antioxidant, it guides the body against chronic diseases such as cancer, eye problems, diabetes and Rheumatoid arthritis.

Vitamin E aids in the production of red blood cells in the body, and helps the body to utilize vitamin A, C and K while also preventing the clumping together of platelets and clogging of arteries that can lead to heart attack or stroke. Vitamin E acts as an enhancer to the immune system, and aids the normal functioning of the brain. It protects the cells of the skin from damaging by boosting the elasticity of collagen found in the skin, hence giving the skin a youthful look. Vitamin E also promotes the growth of healthy hairs in the body and reduces signs of aging.

Vitamin E

 

People who suffer from improper absorption of fats might stand the risk of been vitamin E deficient. Such condition can result to low nerve conduction leading to complicated neurological problems. Vitamin E deficiency can equally lead to low birth weight. Its deficiency symptoms includes the following:

 

 

  • Weakness of the muscle
  • Problems with vision
  • Irregular eye movements
  • Muscle mass loss
  • Unsteady walking
  • Loss of appetite
  • Low growth rate in children
  • Low sex drive
  • Abnormalities of the brain
  • Cataracts
  • Infertility problems
  • Hair loss
  • Leg cramps
  • Reduced blood circulation
  • Enlargement of the prostate
  • Kidney and liver problems

 

Vitamin E deficiency can be prevented by eating diets rich in E vitamin. These include; wheat germ, nuts, green leafy vegetables, peanuts, egg yolks, soybean, sunflower seeds, liver, sweet potatoes, avocado, asparagus, yam and corn-oil margarine.

It is recommended that these food sources should be fortified (if not taken raw) in our diets, to avoid the risk of been vitamin E deficient. Remember, prevention is better than cure! Good health is wealth.Healthy green smoothie

 

 DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Vitamin D ( symptoms and food sources)

Vitamin D 3

Vitamin D

Vitamin D ( symptoms and food sources)

Vitamin D (calciferol) is a group of fat-soluble compounds needed for the maintenance of mineral balance in the body system. Vitamin D is different from other vitamins because of the ability of our body to produce its own vit D form, by converting sunshine to chemicals (calcitriol) that will be used by the body. The cholesterol in our skin converts the vitamin D to vitamin D3 equally known as Cholecalciferol. Another vitamin D group that is formed by irradiating yeast is the vegetarian vitamin D2, which can be converted and used for other body functions. In most cases the body prefers to make use of the vitamin D3 because of its effectiveness. Vitamin D is actually a form of steroid hormone in our body because of its impacts in our blood pressure, skeletal structure, brain function and immunity. This is the sole reason why it is widely recognized as a very essential dietary nutrient needed in the body.

 

Vitamin D modulates the immune system, controls cell division and specialization, maintains healthy blood levels of calcium, phosphorus.

Vitamin D maintains the normal development of bones and teeth in infants and young growing children. It equally maintains normal muscle function, healthy bones and healthy inflammatory response.

vitamin d on note pad

Vitamin D

Vitamin D deficiencies are usually the result of dietary inadequacy when the usual intake is lower than the accepted level. Deficiency can lead to impaired absorption, increased excretion and milk allergy.
Osteomalacia and rickets are the main vitamin D deficiency diseases characterized by the failure of bone tissues leading to skeletal deformities in children.  Osteomalacia as vitamin D deficiency leads to bone pain, muscle weakness and weakness of the bone in adults.

 

Vitamin D deficiencies can be caused by casual sunlight exposure. The skin makes vitamin D when it comes in contact with ultraviolent beta (UVB) rays from the sun. Lack or limited exposure to sun can really increase the risk of been vitamin D deficient.

 

Sunlight still remains the best source of vitamin D. There are also good food sources that can be fortified or added to our diets, such foods are as follows; carp fish, mackerel, mushrooms exposed to ultraviolet light, salmon, cod liver oil, eggs, sardines, raw milk, liver, beef, cheese and orange juice fortified with vitamin D.

 

In conclusion, vit D can work very well with sufficient vitamin A to help the metabolism of the body in the best of its ability.

Note:  self diagnosis is not encouraged, always consult your doctor to know if you are deficient of vitamin D. Your health is paramount, be wise!

 

DISCLAIMER: The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Vital Vitamin C

Vitamin C (symptoms and food sources)

vitamin C picture

Vitamin C

Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) is a natural soluble vitamin present in our food and also added as dietary supplement. Vitamin C is an essential dietary component required for protein metabolism and the biosynthesis of collagen. Collagen plays an important role in wound healing as an essential component of connective tissue in the body.
Vitamin C also plays a vital role in immune function and enhances the absorption of non-heme iron (iron found in plant-based foods). It also acts as antioxidant in the body

 

Vitamin C deficiency leads to scurvy and signs can appear within a month or more. Initial symptoms include inflammation of the gums, weakness, joint pain, fatigue, poor wound healing, loss of teeth and bleeding gums. When scurvy is left untreated, it can result to death.

 

Vegetables and fruits are the best food sources of ascorbic acid. Tomatoes and tomato juice, citrus fruits and potatoes are good contributors of vitamin C to our daily diet. Other good food sources are kiwifruit, strawberries, red and green peppers and brussels sprouts. Many of the fruits and vegetables that are best food sources of vitamin C are consumed raw. Vitamin C content of food may be reduced or destroyed by prolonged storage, heating or cooking.

 

Vitamin C stamp

Vitamin C stamp

Smokers and infants fed with boiled or evaporated milk stand the risk of vitamin C inadequacy.
People suffering from limited food variety, people who abuse alcohol or drugs and people suffering from mental disorder might not absorb sufficient vitamin C. Sufferers of chronic diseases like cancer might also be at risk of ascorbic acid inadequacy.

Excess vitamin C consumption has a very low toxicity and has no adverse effects as proven, though occasionally, one can complain of abdominal cramps, nausea, diarrhoea and gastrointestinal discomfort. It is very important that you do not self diagnose vitamin C deficiency!

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Vitamin B Complex

B12 vitamin

vitamin B

Vitamin B Complex

Vitamin B complex or B-group are water soluble vitamins that aid in the metabolism of the body system. They help in the multiplication of cells for the formation of new DNA.The vitamin B complex consists of the following; vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin), vitamin B5 (panthotenic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), vitamin B7 (biotin), folic acid and vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin).

Vitamin B1 (first to be discovered) strengthens the immune system and enhances the ability of the body to undergo stressful conditions. Thiamine is needed by the body to form adenosine triphosphate (ATP) which provides energy to the body. It also tends to co-ordinate the activities of the nerves and the muscles and aids normal functioning of the heart activity.

Vitamin B2 is needed to protect the cells fro

m oxygen damage because of its roles in the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates and proteins. Riboflavin helps to keep the mucous membranes in a healthy conditions. Vitamin B2 is responsible for that yellowish colouration of the urine when vitamin tablets are administered.

Vitamin B3 is responsible for the conversion of proteins, fats and carbohydrates into energy that will be used by the body. Niacin aids in DNA repair, and the formation of the steroid hormones found in the adrenal gland.

Vitamin B6 enhances the metabolic rate of carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. Also known as Pyridoxine, Vitamin B6 aids the normal functioning of nerves and the formation of red blood cells in the body.

Folic acid is needed for the formation of red blood cells, synthesizing of DNA and normal development of the nervous system.

Vitamin B12 is responsible for the formation and maturation of red blood cells, normal nerve functioning and the synthesizing of DNA.

Symptoms of vitamin B deficiencies and food sources

Presentation of healthy diet

Presentation of healthy diet

Vitamin B1 deficiency can lead to a condition known as Beri-Beri. Can cause partial paralysis especially on people whose diets consists of highly processed carbohydrates, whilst other affected can have heart, breathlessness and swelling. Good food sources of vitamin B1 include lettuce, mushrooms, spinach, sunflower seeds, green peas, tomatoes and sprouts.

Vitamin B2 deficiency leads to glossitis and stomatitis. Vitamin B2 sources are cheese, green vegetables, liver, spinach, legumes, yeast, kidneys, almonds and milk.

Vitamin B3 deficiency can lead to a Pellagra. Such condition is characterised by either dementia, diarrhoea or dermatitis. Foods rich in tryptophan that can convert tryptophan to niacin such as diary products is recommended. Food sources like tomatoes, vegetables, carrots, sweet potatoes, avocados, mushrooms, heart, liver, kidney, chicken, beef, fish (such as salmon, tuna), milk and eggs are encouraged.

Vitamin B6 deficiency can result to anemia, skin problems, nerve damage and sores in the mouth. Foods rich in Vitamin B6 are sprouts, collard greens, asparagus, mushrooms, cabbage, banana, mustard greens, spinach, bell peppers, garlic and tuna.

Folic acid deficiency can lead to anemia, brain defects in fetus, mouth ulcers, depression and confusion. Rich sources are spinach, asparagus, dried or fresh beans, grain products that are fortified, citrus foods, peas and lentils.

Vitamin B12 deficiency can result to anaemia, memory loss, peripheral neuropathy and tremors in infants. Foods that come from animals are advised. In the case of vegetarians, supplements can be recommended too.

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

 

 

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine