Dang Gui – Angelica Sinensis

Dang Gui – Angelica Sinensisdang gui

Some people speak of the traditional Chinese herb Dang Gui (Dong quai) as if it had mystical properties. And in Traditional Chinese Medicine, it does.

Dang Gui, which is the root of a plant known to botanists as Angelica sinensis, was considered in traditional herbal medicine to be a Yin herb. It helps the body contain energies that otherwise would be misdirected. As a treatment for hot flashes, for example, it helps the body channel the energy that otherwise would be used to generate unwanted heat. As a “sweet” herb, it adds a measure of sweetness to emotions and the experience of life. As an “acrid” herb, it wakes up the senses, but in a way that enlightens rather than upsets. And as a warming herb, it helps energies and blood move up in body when they naturally sag down. It redirects the vital energy known as Qi and blood flow back to the heart and brain and away from frivolous uses in the torso.

The legendary applications of Dang Gui have corresponding actions in modern medicine, but how would a pharmacologist look at the herb?

Dang Gui Modifies the Body’s Use of Estrogen

Dang Gui isn’t really a “plant estrogen.” There are plants that make actual estrogen, but Dang Gui is not one of them. Instead, this herb is more “estrogenic” than “estrogen.” The ferulic acid in estrogen occupies some of the same receptor sites as estrogen on the outer membranes of cells in the breast and uterus. It activates these cells in the same way as estrogen, even when there isn’t actual estrogen in circulation.[1] However, it can also activate cells in the breast and uterus that don’t have estrogen receptors.[2] In this way, the ferulic acid in Dang Gui is a kind of “super estrogen” that counteracts some of the effects of menopause. This property also means, however, that it should not be used by women who have breast or uterine cancer, whether or not their cancers are estrogen-receptor positive.

Dang Gui Has a Unique Effect on the Immune System

There are complex sugars (polysaccharides) in Dang Gui that modulate the immune system without necessarily stimulating or suppressing it. These polysaccharides fit into different kinds of receptor sites on white blood cells to activate them to fight infection. This effect occurs specifically in T cells. It’s known to occur when dong quai is brewed into a hot-water tea.[3]

However, Dang Gui also contains compounds that keep specialized mast cells from breaking open to release histamine. In this way one compound in Dang Gui  activates the immune system to fight infection, but another compound in Dang Gui stops allergies.[4]

Dang Gui Relaxes Breathingdang gui 2

About 1-1/2% of the total weight of dong quai is a compound called ligustilide. This chemical relaxes the smooth muscles around the bronchial passages.[5] It relieves asthma, although this makes dong quai an herb you don’t want to take if you have COPD.

Modern Science Confirms Dang Gui’s Use as a “Detoxifier”

Traditional Chinese Medicine uses Dang Gui in tonics to “purify” the blood. What actually happens is that complex carbohydrates, the previously mentioned polysaccharides, lock on to receptor sites on a set of white blood cells known as macrophages. These are large white blood cells that can surround and “eat” germs. They patrol the body looking for bacteria and other microorganisms. Dang Gui polysaccharides stimulate them to patrol more of the body to look in more places for germs.[6]

Dang Gui also plays a role In “liver tonics.” Some plant chemicals in the herb activate the Kuppfer cells, which are the liver’s immune system.[7] Other plant chemicals in the herb prevent the process of apoptosis, also known as cell suicide, when liver tissue is exposed to toxins. They keep the liver alive even when it’s been shocked by exposure to a poison. It’s the whole herb, not a chemical extract, that has this protective effective on the liver, and it’s the whole herb soaked in beverage alcohol (wine in Traditional Chinese Medicine) that helps the liver recover after toxic exposure.[8]

Dang Gui Has Anti-Ulcer Effects

One of the modern uses of Dang Gui formulas in China is the treatment of ulcerative colitis. The herb doesn’t stop the process of ulcer formation, but it accelerates tissue repair.[9] This is a benefit that would be noticed after taking an herbal tea.

Dang Gui Is Helpful for Some Men, Too

Traditional Korean herbal remedies for premature ejaculation usually focus on dang gui. It contains phytochemicals that raise the “vibratory threshold” for ejaculation, so that sex has to last longer and has to be more vigorous for the man to climax.[10]

The Best Known Use of Dang Gui Is In an Herbal Formula

Clinical researchers in universities as far apart as China and Texas have done extensive studies of a traditional formula that combines dong quai with other ingredients, especially white peony root. This Dang Gui and Peony Decoction, also known as Dang Gui Shao Yao San, or Toki-shakuyaku-san (TJ-23) in Japan, or Dangguijakyak-san (DJS) in Korea, or Tang-Kuei and Peony in most English-speaking countries, is showing considerable promise as a treatment for Alzheimer’s.

Researchers at the University of Texas noticed that when they gave elderly women this formula for hormone-related problems, they became mentally sharper and their memories improved. This led to a series of clinical trials all over the world involving both men and women to see if the formula could be a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.[11]

Japanese clinical trials have found that Dang Gui  and Peony Decoction can be used to prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s and cognitive impairment caused by multiple-infarct dementia.[12] It may also prevent dementia and memory loss In Parkinson’s disease.[13]

And this formula may stop the Alzheimer’s-like complications of “type 3” diabetes. Dang Gui and Peony Decoction counteracts the effects of harmful free radicals, like those that are released when blood sugar levels are too high. [14]

The benefits of Dang Gui for the brain are not obtained from the use of Dang Gui by itself. It has to be combined with the other herbs of the traditional Chinese formula. These herbs act synergistically with Dang Gui for the formula’s combined effects.[15] But this profound effect of an unpatented, ancient, traditional herbal medicine may provide more benefits for Alzheimer’s patients that any other pharmaceutical treatments.

Dang Gui Isn’t a Miracle Herb, But…

angelica sinensis dang gui

Dang Gui is an especially useful herb, but that doesn’t mean it’s a cure-all. It’s very useful for treating women’s problems that are caused by a lack of estrogen. It can be very helpful for men who are concerned about premature ejaculation. And it’s a possible wonder-drug for preventing Alzheimer’s and the dementia that follows tiny blood clots in the brain.

Just don’t give up on traditional medicine to use Dang Gui. All herbs are best used with the best medicines your doctor can prescribe. Herbs don’t replace medicine. Be honest and open with an honest and open-minded doctor to get the best results from using Dang Gui or any other herb.

 

[1] Eagon PK, Elm MS, Hunter DS, et al. Medicinal herbs: modulation of estrogen action. Era of Hope Mtg, Dept Defense; Breast Cancer Res Prog, Atlanta, GA 2000;Jun 8-11.

[2] Lau CBS, Ho TCY, Chan TWL, Kim SCF. Use of dong quai (Angelica sinensis) to treat peri- and postmenopausal symptoms in women with breast cancer: is it appropriate? Menopause 2005;12:734-40.

[3] Kumazawa, Y., Nakatsuru, Y., Fujisawa, H., Nishimura, C., Mizunoe, K., Otsuka, Y., and Nomoto, K. Lymphocyte activation by a polysaccharide fraction separated from hot water extracts of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa. J Pharmacobiodyn. 1985;8(6):417-424.

[4] Wei-An Mao, Yuan-Yuan Sun, Jing-Yi Mao, et al. Inhibitory Effects of Angelica Polysaccharide on Activation of Mast Cells. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2016;2016:6063475 doi:10.1155/2016/6063475.

[5] Zhao KJ, Dong TT, Tu PF, et al. Molecular genetic and chemical assessment of radix Angelica (Danggui) in China. J Agric Food Chem 2003;51:2576-83.

[6] Wang, Y. and Zhu, B. [The effect of angelica polysaccharide on proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cell]. Zhonghua Yi Xue.Za Zhi 1996;76(5):363-366.

[7] Wang J, Xia XY, Peng RX, Chen X. [Activation of the immunologic function of rat Kupffer cells by the polysaccharides of Angelica sinensis]. Yao Xue Xue Bao. 2004 Mar;39(3):168-71. Chinese.

PMID: 15171648.

[8] Niu C, Wang J, Ji L, Wang Z. Protection of Angelica sinensis (Oliv) Diels against hepatotoxicity induced by Dioscorea bulbifera L. and its mechanism. Biosci Trends. 2014 Oct;8(5):253-9. PMID: 25382441.

[9] 48430 Cho, C. H., Mei, Q. B., Shang, P., Lee, S. S., So, H. L., Guo, X., and Li, Y. Study of the gastrointestinal protective effects of polysaccharides from Angelica sinensis in rats. Planta Med 2000;66(4):348-351.

[10] Choi HK, Jung GW, Moon KH, et al. Clinical study of SS-Cream in patients with lifelong premature ejaculation. Urology 2000;55:257-61.

[11] Fu X, Wang Q, Wang Z, Kuang H, Jiang P. Danggui-Shaoyao-San: New Hope for Alzheimer’s Disease.

Aging Dis. 2015 Dec 20;7(4):502-13. doi: 10.14336/AD.2015.1220. eCollection 2016 Aug. Review.

PMID: 27493835.

[12] Kitabayashi Y, Shibata K, Nakamae T, Narumoto J, Fukui K (2007). Effect of traditional Japanese herbal medicine toki-shakuyakusan for mild cognitive impairment: SPECT study. Psychiatry Clin Neurosci, 61: 447-448.

[13] Matsuoka T, Narumoto J, Shibata K, Okamura A, Taniguchi S, Kitabayashi Y, et al. (2012). Effect of toki-shakuyaku-san on regional cerebral blood flow in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 2012:245091.

[14] Fu X, Wang Q, Wang Z, Kuang H, Jiang P. Danggui-Shaoyao-San: New Hope for Alzheimer’s Disease.

Aging Dis. 2015 Dec 20;7(4):502-13. doi: 10.14336/AD.2015.1220. eCollection 2016 Aug. Review.

PMID: 27493835.

[15] Yang WJ, Li DP, Li JK, Li MH, Chen YL, Zhang PZ. Synergistic antioxidant activities of eight traditional Chinese herb pairs. Biol Pharm Bull. 2009 Jun;32(6):1021-6. PMID: 19483308.

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Sydney Acupuncture & Sydney Chinese Herbal Medicine

Six Stages to effective Hamstring Rehabilitation

6 Stages to Effective Hamstring Rehabilitation

hamstring 1

Rian Kenny Chiro, wanted to present his thoughts at a more in depth look at one of the more common presentations at the clinic, Hamstring Strains!

From a slight strain or a ‘twinge’ to a more serious grade ‘tear’ it is unfortunately an injury that often reoccurs especially if a thorough rehabilitation program is not completed.

 

A systematic review performed in the UK and published in the 2009 Strength and Conditioning Journal 31(1) concluded; there are 6 key steps or stages that need to be addressed in order to properly rehabilitate and reduce the chance of reoccurrence.

hamstring 3

1. Initial Treatment

The general RICER protocol should be followed during the first 48 hours of any acute soft tissue injury. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation and Referral (To a qualified professional)

2. Restoring Range of Motion

A stretching protocol involving a minimum of 4 stretching session each day using a combination of 3-4 stretches held for 30-45 seconds each. It was suggested that the early increase in range of motion is essential in reducing scar tissue formation.

3. Initial Strengthening

Along with stage 2, Resistance training (very light to no resistance) is introduced incorporating use of available range of motion. Exercises such as Deadlifts, Romanian deadlifts and light leg curls will target the hamstring group.

4. Slow Eccentric Strengthening

Eccentric movement is defined as a muscle lengthening under a load, for example during a squat going from a standing position to squat position is eccentrically utilising muscles and from squat to stand is a concentric action. It has been shown that eccentric action is essential for muscular hypertrophy (cell size) and hyperplasia (cell number). So this stage requires introduction of slow lowering exercises such as Deadlifts, Nordic Hamstring Lowers, back extensions and lunges, with most focus on the lengthening or eccentric phase of the exercises.

5. High Speed Eccentric

As above but introducing more plyometric (jumping) based exercises and sports specific drills at greater speeds, for example; split jumps, depth jumps from a bench and other bounding drills.

6. Sports Specific

The last phase of a full rehabilitation program involves taking the athlete from straight line activities to dynamic change of direction tasks with different surfaces and body positions e.g. single leg bounding, acceleration drills, zig-zag running and hopping activities.

It is essential each phase is carefully monitored to avoid aggravation of the condition. If you have been struggling with a hamstring injury and finding it a frustrating recovery come and have a chat with one of the team..hamstring 2

Book with Rian Here

 

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

 

Kids and Acupuncture Techniques

Kids and acupuncture

kids

By Audrey Cortez 

A question we are asked often in clinic is, “Can acupuncture help children for their ailments/conditions?” and the answer is a resounding “Yes!”. The question most ask is  “do you use needles on children?” and the answer is in short is “Yes” and “no”; let us explain first with a little bit of history and techniques used today.

History

In China and Japan, paediatric medicine historically not as well respected as it is today, due to a multiple of reasons such as: high mortality rate or children were seen as a ‘burden’. During Japan’s Edo period attitudes to paediatric medicine began to change when diseases such as small pox, measles and parasitic conditions became prevalent. In this era the Shonishin technique was born. It was here acupuncturists (especially blind acupuncturists) were not able to needle under law consequently, these acupuncturists developed the “Shonishin” technique which is using specific tools which are non-invasive and results are quite effective (Wernike 2014). In China at the same time, paediatric medicine was more focused on herbal medicine utilising popular formulas and modifying them to fit the child’s needs.

Selection of Shoni Shin tools for pediatric acupuncture

What is Shonishin?

The word Shonishin can be broken into two parts: ‘shoni’ meaning ‘child’ and ‘shin’ meaning ‘needle or needling’. The Shonishin technique is a non-invasive which is pain free and relatively easy to perform for the practitioner. It involves using a simple tool which looks like a nail, and its used to stroke gently on the patient’s skin. The technique itself is like a massage which children are more welcoming than being needled or taking herbal medicine, which sometimes may not be a pleasant experience for both parent/carer and child. One advantage of performing Shonishin techniques is it can be used a whole extensive range of ailments and it be done on from as young as 6 weeks old to adults. Another advantage is the technique is relatively quick to do which is great as children are quick to respond to treatment.

 

What other techniques used?

Other techniques used for paediatric acupuncture are massage such as Shiatzu or Tui Na and using Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT)  devises. These techniques are once again non-invasive which is great while treating because they do not cause pain to the child and can be combined with herbal medicine.

 

Can you needle young patients?

Macro detail of a pine brush Japanese Shonishin acupuncture tool being used on young boy’s leg

This is an interesting question to answer. In short, yes you can needle children if they feel confident in the knowledge the needles are there to help them then there is no reason for them not to start early. Children are very open to needles and if explained properly. Of course, for those who are scared of needle, they can always opt for the non-invasive techniques if they choose to change their minds at the last minute.

In the next newletter we will be discussing what common conditions paediatric acupuncture can treat and what research supports this.

Here at the Sydney Acupuncture Clinic we offer non-invasive paediatric acupuncture treatments with both the Shonishin technique and laser acupuncture.

 

Book With Audrey Here

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Water in Traditional Chinese Medicine

waterWater in Traditional Chinese Medicine

What is the one ingredient that is found in absolutely every part of traditional Chinese herbal medicine? It’s water, of course. Water is essential to life, but the ancient understanding of water can inform our own lives.

Water as an “Element”

Water is one of the five “elements” in Traditional Chinese Medici ne, along with wood, fire, earth, and metal. Water is the winter element that feeds the new growth, the “wood,” of spring. Not surprisingly, it is associated with the kidneys.

However, the “kidney’ in Traditional Chinese Medicine is not just a physical organ. It is a set of energies that become emotions that in turn become physical objects, all associated with human reproduction and development. The kidneys are the governing organ of the sex organs. Their energies create vaginal fluids and semen, as well as, of course, urine. But they are also the governing organ of “development,” including bones and hair, and the govern the body’s ability to make and detect sound.

Surely this quaint ancient theory does not have any bearing on the modern understanding of health, does it? We invite you to judge for yourself.

The Surprising Importance of Hydration from Head to Toe

Keeping adequately hydrated by drinking enough water with electrolytes is essential to life, but it is also essential to some unexpected aspects of healthy living. Here are just a few reasons we need water in ways that are predicted by Traditional Chinese Medicine.

  • The hair on your head and the skin on your scalp are regenerated by stem cells. Some of these stem cells differentiate into melanocytes, the cells that make the natural color in your hair. Some of these cells differentiate into hair follicles, which generate the hair itself. The two groups of stem cells communicate by hormones and chemical messengers that they send through the tiny capillaries and intercellular fluid in the scalp. If the color-making cells can’t communicate to the hair-making cells, guess what happens? Gray hair. Regular hydration is important to maintain your natural hair colour.[1]
  • The voice In older adults, in particular, tends to shimmer and jitter when the body is dehydrated. Dehydrated people cannot hold a sound so that it blends into other syllables. Their voices have a reduced resonance and a higher frequency (but not in a good way). Drinking water helps to restore the voice. Steam inhalation is useful, too. Voice problems may be prevented by using a nebulizer that provides pure water in tiny droplets.[2]
  • The human body ordinarily keeps almost all of its calcium in the bones and just a tiny amount of calcium in the bloodstream to power muscles and nerves. Dehydration can be a cause of hypercalcemia, too much calcium in the bloodstream.[3]
  • In Traditional Chinese Medicine, the “kidney” (which is a concept more than a physical organ) also governs the knees. You won’t find dehydration listed as a trigger for attacks of knee arthritis (or gout in the ankles and toes), but that is the experience of many people who have to manage these diseases.[4]

How Much Water Is Enough?

Some health-minded people are so intent on staying hydrated that they walk around making sloshing sounds. The best amount of water isn’t more, more, more.  Healthy hydration keeps water consumption in balance with the amount of water that the body uses, no more and no less.

Infants and disabled people are especially susceptible to dehydration because they can’t get their own fluids to drink. Older children are especially susceptible to dehydration because their bodies keep less water in the interstitial fluid around their tissues. The most common precipitating event that leads to death from dehydration is diarrhea. If you get diarrhea, keep hydrated!

It takes as little as 1.2 liters (5 cups) of water a day to keep hydrated. Drinking 3 or more liters of water a day is actually associated with poorer health outcomes, not better.[5] (If you happen to live in the Australian Outback or some other desert, of course, you may actually need more water—but you probably won’t have a longer lifespan as a result of drinking it).

The key is what else is in the water. Water that contains just a little sodium, the ion found in table salt, can keep your body hydrated up to twice as long as water that does not.[6] Almost any natural beverage contains at least a little sodium, even orange juice, whole (full-fat) milk, and tea.  Caffeinated and carbonated beverages are not dehydrating.[7] Tea, in particular, including tea with milk, does not dehydrate.[8]

Hydration Isn’t All About What You Drink

Traditional Chinese Medicine tells us that mastering the “water” element, however, is not just about drinking water and other beverages. The kidney is a yin vessel that stores a property called jing, or essence. This is the set of instructions that the body follows to make its densest structures, such as bone.

The “energy kidney” also consolidates the mysterious energy called chi that governs over our lives from birth to death. It is specifically related to our ability to pro-create, physical growth through childhood, and transition in to old age. Someone with a compromised water element will not have the vitality and endurance necessary throughout our lives to endure, especially during stressful times of change.

You can’t tackle life’s challenges if you aren’t physically hydrated. But you become “spiritually hydrated” by conquering fear, anxiety, and specific phobias. When we master the fluid challenges of our daily lives, we overcome fear. And when we overcome fear, we master the energies of water, unleashing vital energy to make us healthier from head to toe.

Drinking water, tea, and other healthy beverages won’t automatically result in mastery of the watery aspects of human vitality. A great deal of healthy hydration really stems from emotional health, not just diet. But getting at least those 5 cups, 1.2 liters, of water every day is a healthy start to hydration. If you drink water, you have some of the physical sustenance you need to master your life energies. And if you master your life energies, you will keep your water intake and use in healthy balance.

 

[1] Hsu YC, Li L, Fuchs E. Emerging interactions between skin stem cells and their niches. Nat Med. 2014 Aug;20(8):847-56. doi: 10.1038/nm.3643. Review. PMID: 25100530.

[2] Alves M, Krüger E, Pillay B, van Lierde K, van der Linde J. The Effect of Hydration on Voice Quality in Adults: A Systematic Review.J Voice. 2017 Nov 6. pii: S0892-1997(17)30389-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2017.10.001. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PMID: 29122414.

[3] Fernandes LG, Ferreira NR, Cardiga R, Póvoa P. Severe hypercalcaemia and colon ischaemia: dehydration as an unusual cause? BMJ Case Rep. 2015 Mar 25;2015. pii: bcr2014208809. doi: 10.1136/bcr-2014-208809.

PMID: 25809432.

[4] Abhishek A, Valdes AM, Jenkins W, Zhang W, Doherty M. Triggers of acute attacks of gout, does age of gout onset matter? A primary care based cross-sectional study. PLoS One. 2017 Oct 12;12(10):e0186096. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0186096. eCollection 2017. PMID: 29023487.

[5] Kant AK, Graubard BI. A prospective study of water intake and subsequent risk of all-cause mortality in a national cohort.Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Jan;105(1):212-220. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.116.143826. Epub 2016 Nov 30.

PMID: 27903521.

[6] Sims ST, van Vliet L, Cotter JD, Rehrer NJ. Sodium loading aids fluid balance and reduces physiological strain of trained men exercising in the heat. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2007;39:123–30.

[7] Grandjean AC, Reimers KJ, Bannick KE, Haven MC. The effect of caffeinated, non-caffeinated, caloric and non-caloric beverages on hydration. J Am Coll Nutr. 2000 Oct;19(5):591-600. PMID: 11022872.

[8] Ruxton CH, Hart VA. Black tea is not significantly different from water in the maintenance of normal hydration in human subjects: results from a randomised controlled trial.Br J Nutr. 2011 Aug;106(4):588-95. doi: 10.1017/S0007114511000456. Epub 2011 Mar 30. PMID: 21450118.

 

water

Water fall

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine 

Chai Hu, aka Bupleurum

Chai  Hu

Leaves and flowers of Bupleurum gibraltaricum

The Chinese herb Chai Hu, also known by its botanical name Bupleurum falcatum or just as “bupleurum”, is a mainstay of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). TCM uses bupleurum as one of many ingredients in herbal formulas, although scientific researchers have found unique uses for single unique components of the plant.

What Is Chai Hu?

Chai Hu is an Asian member of the same plant family as carrots and parsley. It flowers in umbels, spherical clusters of dozens of tiny flowers that appear at the top of the plant. This herb was not used in TCM in ancient times, but it has appeared in dozens of herbal “recipes” over the last 500 years.

What Is the Traditional Understanding of How Chai Hu Works?

Traditional Chinese Medicine described the effects of herbs in terms of metaphors that guided practitioners to practical uses of plants. Chai Hu was described as a “cooling” plant. That does not mean it literally lowered temperature. Instead, it corrected hyperactive energies.

In the “Liver,” which[according to TCM] ancient herbalists understood as the place emotions were stored, Chai Hu relieved blockages or stagnation of the Qi energy. Chai Hu was included into a formula to assist release emotion constraints,  so that they did not congeal into physical problems in other parts of the body. These constraints of of Liver Qi energy would and could manifest at liver, breasts and or eyes conditions .

In the “Spleen,” Chai Hu contributed to reduce the effects of gastrointestinal upset. It stopped vomiting, relieved pressure on the chest and took away [any] bitter or metallic tastes that linger in the mouth.

Chai Hu also helped the Qi flow through a channel called the Middle Jiao. It has an upwards lifting effect thus helping with formulas to assist  uterine prolapse and hemorrhoids.

Why Are Medical Scientists Interested in Chai Hu Formulas Today?

Researchers are looking at novel uses of this ancient herb. One team of researchers ( Lorrai I, et al 2017) investigating the use of a chemical component of the plant, a saikosaponin, as a method treating chocolate addiction. [1] Another group of scientists is refining another chemical in Chai Hu as an antidote for panadol poisoning.[2] Yet another research team is using Chai Hu as a natural biofactory to create gold nanoparticles, which creates highly bioactive enzymes.[3]

It has turned out that ancient herbal formulas that contain bupleurum have some remarkable, clinically tested effects when they are used to treat illness as conventional, scientific medicine understands it.

Xiao Chai Hu Tang, which is also known by its Japanese name, sho-saiko-to, and by its English name, Minor Bupleurum Decoction, has a major impact in treating medically defined liver diseases.  Clinical trials have found that this bupleurum formula slows the destruction of liver tissue by fibrosis and fatty infiltration. [In a study by [insert], it was shown to reduce] It reduces the risk of liver cancer in people who have chronic viral hepatitis. [4] A clinical trial at Sloan-Kettering Hospital In New York City confirmed that it slowed the progression of hepatitis C in patients who were [unsuitable] not candidates for interferon (this formula must not be used with interferon) or modern treatments like Sovaldi.[5] A variation of this formula is used to help children reduce the symptoms of tonsillitis to reduce the the possibility of a tonsillectomy  and it has also been used to stop life-threatening symptoms of toxic shock.[6]

Major Bupleurum Decoction, Da Chai Hu Tang, also known by its Japanese name dai-saiko-to,  is clinically demonstrated to relieve severe menstrual cramps.[7] And bupleurum is one of a number of ingredients in a Japanese herbal formula called bofu-tsusho-san, which aid people who have diabetes lose weight.

What Can Go Wrong with Chai Hu?

(Bupleurum )

There is one prominent drug interaction with Chai Hu (bupleurum). People who take interferon should never take any kind of formula that contains Chai Hu. Other than that, the problem with formulas that contain Chai Hu is most likely to be that it works too well.  People who take Chai Hu formulas to prevent vomiting may find they have no appetite at all. People who take Chai Hu formulas to prevent anxiety or tension may find it just a little too easy to, for instance, curl up and take a nap. Used with professional guidance, however, Chai Hu formulas can be remarkably effective.  [Insert something about always disclose to your doctor any herbal medicine/anything you take]

[1] Lorrai I, Maccioni P, Carai MA, Capra A, Castelli MP, Riva A, Morazzoni P, Gessa GL, Colombo G. Suppressing effect of saikosaponin A, an active ingredient of Bupleurum falcatum, on chocolate self-administration and reinstatement of chocolate seeking in rats. Neurosci Lett. 2017 Jan 18;638:211-217. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2016.12.019. Epub 2016 Dec 19. PMID: 28007642.

[2] Liu A, Tanaka N, Sun L, Guo B, Kim JH, Krausz KW, Fang Z, Jiang C, Yang J, Gonzalez FJ. Saikosaponin d protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibiting NF-κB and STAT3 signaling.

Chem Biol Interact. 2014 Nov 5;223:80-6. doi: 10.1016/j.cbi.2014.09.012. Epub 2014 Sep 27.

PMID: 25265579.

[3] Lee YJ, Cha SH, Lee KJ, Kim YS, Cho S, Park Y. Plant Extract (Bupleurum falcatum) as a Green Factory for Biofabrication of Gold Nanoparticles. Nat Prod Commun. 2015 Sep;10(9):1593-6. PMID: 26594767.

[4] Lee JK, Kim JH, Shin HK. Therapeutic effects of the oriental herbal medicine Sho-saiko-to on liver cirrhosis and carcinoma. Hepatol Res. 2011 Sep;41(9):825-37. doi: 10.1111/j.1872-034X.2011.00829.x. Epub 2011 Jun 17.

PMID: 21682829.

[5] Morgan TR. Chemoprevention of hepatocellular carcinoma in chronic hepatitis C. Recent Results Cancer Res. 2011;188:85-99. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-10858-7_7. Review. PMID: 21253791.

[6] Sakaguchi S, Furusawa S, Iizuka Y. Preventive effects of a traditional Chinese medicine (Sho-saiko-to) on septic shock symptoms; approached from heme metabolic disorders in endotoxemia. Biol Pharm Bull. 2005 Jan;28(1):165-8. PMID: 15635185.

[7] Horiba Y, Yoshino T, Watanabe K. Daisaikoto for menstrual pain: a lesson from a case with menstrual pain successfully treated with daisaikoto. Case Rep Med. 2015;2015:929514. doi: 10.1155/2015/929514. Epub 2015 Feb 22. PMID: 25792985.

 

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine 

Derma Microneedle Roller

192 Needle Derma Microneedle Roller Skin Therapy 

 

  What is derma roller?

Derma rollers have become increasingly popular over the last decade, and many people use them for all sorts of skin-related problems, such as acne, scars, cellulite, stretch marks, anti-aging, wrinkles, and even hyper-pigmentation. A Derma skin roller is a small barrel-like roller with around 200 tiny micro-needles that, when rolled on the skin, create tiny punctures, pushing the pores open for a short period of time. The body reacts as if it has been damaged, releasing growth factors that stimulate the production of collagen and elastin, forming new, healthy skin. The roller can be used on almost any part of the body, except for the most of sensitive location such as the eyelids and lips.

How to use dermaroller (if you don’t want to bleed)

1) Use dermaroller to roll on your skin vertically for 10 times, horizontally for 10 times to form + shape. Then roll another 20 times with
different directions to form x shape, like the below picture.
2) Apply oil on your skin.
How to use Derma roller (if you want to roll harder with long needles roller until bleed a lot) :
1) Apply lidocaine 10% spray for 30 seconds to numb your skin to prevent the pain later. Click here for the info of lidocain 10% spray.
2) Use Derma roller to roll on your skin for 10 times per direction to form + shape and x shape, like the below picture.
3) Wash away the lidocaine from your face with water.
4) Apply oil on your skin.

How many time I can dermarolling in a month?
It is depend on how fast your skin can heal/recovery. Normally if you roll harder with longer needles causing a lot of bleed, you will need to wait 3 days to let the redness disappear and you will need to wait another 4 days to let the blackness disappear, so total 7 days that you need to wait. You can derma roll again only when all redness and blackness disappear, because if you dermarolling too many times on redness / blackness scars, it will cause hyperpigmentation appear. So 1 week can roll 1 time only if you plan to roll harder until bleed. Laser treatment also can do only 1 time per month right? Because worry hyperpigmentation appear.

 

What length of dermaroller should I use?

  • 2.5mm or 3mm is for body skins like legs, ass, stomach which have thicker skin.
  • 1.5mm or 2mm is for removing the sink inside scars like ice-pick, pitted / boxcar, rolling scars, wrinkles.
  • 1mm is for dark black scars, hyperpigmentation, pigmentation.
  • 0.2mm to 0.75mm are used to make the beautiful skin become more beautiful, or used to make the skin more easy absorb the nutrition of cream products.
How many sessions that A dermaroller can be used?


30 to 50 sessions. You can use it until the head of needles no longer sharp.
How long it takes to removes all my deep scars completely?
10 months if you dermarolling without apply any cream. 7 months if you dermarolling + revitol / dermagist cream (it is based on 10 days per session).

Should I use derma-roller or derma-stamp?

Derma-roller head is bigger. Derma-stamp head is smaller. So it is better you use dermaroller if you have many scars on big area on
your face, because you will need to spend long long time if you use small head derma-stamp on big area. You can use derma-stamp
on the small area which derma-roller cannot reach, for example the nose area and near the eyes area.

Can I use dermaroller without apply any oil?

Yes, you can use dermaroller without apply oil. Actually the purpose of applying cream is just to faster the scars removal progress.

 

 

Dermaroller

DISCLAIMER

The information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient’s own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care.

Thanks and graduate for reading this blog if you would like to discuss your individual needs, please feel free to email info@roddsanchez.com.au or 02 8213 2888. 

Rodd Sanchez Sydney acupuncture and Chinese medicine